A Guide to Understanding The Cheerleading Worlds Scoresheets

Updated April 14, 2023

The Cheerleading Worlds 2023 is almost here, and scoring is top of mind. Not only does the Cheerleading Worlds use a different scoresheet, but they also utilize a distinct scoring methodology. The United Scoring System used by Varsity All Star and many other popular event producers is much more structured than the USASF and IASF scoresheets. If you’d like to learn more about the United Scoring System, you can view our guide here.

Comparative Scoring

The USASF and IASF scoresheets use comparative scoring, which means that scores are relative to performances at the day’s event compared to other teams in your division and level. In most sections, you must perform a certain number of skills to enter a specific score range. After you enter a range, it is at the judging panel’s discretion to give an ordinal ranking compared to the other teams within a division for each category. Comparisons are for the same day only and will reset the following day. Therefore, comparing a prelims score to a semi-finals score to a finals score is not helpful. Each day is its own competition. 

This is very different from the United Scoring System. The United Scoring System outlines how to win points in each section. First, you must perform enough skills to enter a specific range, and then in many sections, you’re awarded drivers based on how difficult those skills are. The difficulty section is more or less objective. In the execution and technique section of the United Scoring System, a team starts with the maximum number of points, and judges deduct based on widespread issues within that section. While it is subjective, it is pretty straightforward. 

Increased Ranges

The USASF/IASF ranges are much larger than the United Scoring System’s. For example, the United Scoring System Pyramid section allows judges to award between 3.5 and 4 difficulty points in the high range. Scores are awarded in tenths, meaning a judge can award six different scores, and it is the only difficultly score that United Scoring Judges can offer subjective points. In contrast, in the USASF Pyramid difficulty section, once you perform level-appropriate skills and at least two structures, the judging panel awards 6.0-10 points in tenths. That means there are 41 different scores a judge can award just for difficulty.

Increased ranges allow judges to separate teams based on how difficult they perceive their skills. While the United Scoring System only allows judges to award a subjective difficulty score for the pyramid, the USASF and IASF scoresheets enable judges to do this for every section. Scores are not tied to individual skills but rather how difficult or well-executed those skills are to a team’s competitors that day. 

Quick Breakdown of Scoring Considerations

  • Comparative scoring – scores are relative to performances at the day’s event compared to other teams in your division and/or level.
  • Points are awarded in tenths (1/10)
  • Score comparisons reset from day to day
  • You can expect score fluctuations from day to day
  • Synchronized tumbling is defined as passes that are intended to start and finish at the same time with more than one athlete. They do not need to be the same skills.
  • Jumps and standing tumbling are judged separately, even if they are connected (IASF only)
  • The IASF scoresheets are also used for international divisions at The Summit.

How Judging Panels Are Set Up

  • 7 Worlds Panels
  • 28 Building Judges – 4 Per Panel
  • 14 Tumbling Judges – 2 Per Panel
  • 14 Overal Judges – 2 Per Panel
  • 7 Quality Judges – 1 Per Panel
  • 3 Venue Head Judges

USASF vs. IASF Scoresheets

The USASF and IASF are also different from one another. IASF emphasizes building skills, including Stunts, Pyramids, Tosses, and Building Creativity, and USASF’s scoresheet assigns similar point values for building and tumbling. 

USASF (150 Points)

  • Building – 43.3%
  • Tumbling – 40.0%
  • Overall/Choreography – 16.7%

IASF – Tumbling Divisions (150 Points)

  • Building – 66.7%
  • Tumbling – 13.3%
  • Overall/Choreography – 20.0%

ISASF – Global Divisions (160 Points)

  • Building – 62.5%
  • Tumbling – 12.5%
  • Overall/Choreography – 25.0%

IASF – Non-Tumbling Divisions (135 Points)

  • Building –  74.1%
  • Jumps – 3.7%
  • Overall/Choreography – 22.2%

Table of Contents

Where to Find Each Scoring Document

This guide is intended for entertainment purposes only. Please find the official scoring documents available on USASF and IASF’s websites below. 

USASF – Level 6

Total Points: 150

USASF Stunt (20 Points)

Teams will score in the high range (6.0-10) when a majority of athletes perform level-appropriate skills. Within the high range, a team will receive a score based on how other teams perform in their division on that day. Coed teams must perform at least one single-based or assisted single-based stunt to score above an 8.0. While you only need a majority to enter the high range, one of the biggest difficulty considerations is minimal use of bases, which means more stunts in the air.  

Stunt Difficulty – All Girl (10 Points)

  • 0 Points – No skills performed
  • 1.0-6.0 Points – Less than a majority of the athletes perform level-appropriate skills
  • 6.0-10 points – A majority of the athletes perform level-appropriate skills

Stunt Majority Definition

  • Based on 4-person stunt groups
  • The Majority is determined by dividing the total number of athletes by 4, dividing by two, and then adding one group. (Total Athletes / 4) / 2 + 1 = Majority. You round down if there is a decimal. 
  • Example: 38 athletes / 4 = 9.5 stunt groups divided by 2 equals 4.75 plus 1 equals 5.75, and then you round down to 5.
  • Stunts are cumulative throughout the routine

Stunt Difficulty Scoring Considerations Once in Range

  • Skill degree of difficulty
  • Team participation percentage
  • Minimal use of bases
  • Variety of load-ins, dismounts, and transitions
  • Additional skills and skill combinations may increase your score within a range (includes non-level appropriate skills)

Stunt Difficulty – Coed (10 Points)

  • 0 Points –  No skills performed
  • 1.0-6.0 Points –  Less than a majority of the athletes perform level-appropriate skills
  • 6.0-8.0 Points – A majority of the athletes perform level-appropriate skills. No single-based or assisted single-based stunts were performed.
  • 6.0-10.0 Points – A majority of the athletes perform level-appropriate skills, and the team performs single-based skills and/or a combination of multi-based and single-based stunts.

Stunt Difficulty Scoring Considerations Once in Range:

  • Skill degree of difficulty
  • Team participation percentage
  • Minimal use of bases
  • Variety of load-ins, dismounts, and transitions
  • Additional skills and skill combinations may increase your score within a range (includes non-level appropriate skills)

Stunt Technique (Both All Girl and Coed) (10 Points)

  • 0 Points – No skills performed
  • 1.0-5.0 Points – Skills performed with poor execution, stability, flexibility, and synchronization
  • 5.0-8.0 Points – Skills performed with average execution, stability, flexibility, and synchronization
  • 8.0-10.0 Points – Skills performed with above-average execution, stability, flexibility, and synchronization

USASF Pyramid (20 Points)

As is the case with Stunts, when teams perform level-appropriate skills with at least two structures, they will score in the high range (6.0-10.0). Judges will assign a score compared to the other teams’ pyramid skills and execution. 

Pyramid Difficulty (10 Points)

  • 0 Points – No skills performed
  • 1.0-6.0 Points – No level-appropriate skills and/or less than two structures
  • 6.0-10 Points – Level appropriate skills and at least two structures

Pyramid Difficulty Scoring Considerations Once in Range

  • Skill degree of difficulty
  • Team participation percentage
  • Minimal use of bases
  • Variety of load-ins, dismounts, and transitions
  • Additional skills and skill combinations may increase your score within a range (includes non-level appropriate skills)

Pyramid Technique (10 Points) 

  • 0 Points – No skills performed
  • 1.0-5.0 Points – Skills performed with poor execution, stability, flexibility, and synchronization
  • 5.0-8.0 Points – Skills performed with average execution, stability, flexibility, and synchronization
  • 8.0-10.0 Points – Skills performed with above-average execution, stability, flexibility, and synchronization

USASF Tosses (20 Points)

To enter the high range (9.0-10.0 points), a majority of the team must perform a level-appropriate toss. As you will see listed under the scoring considerations, if a team performs additional skill combinations, it may increase your difficulty score. Looks like we might see more than just kick-doubles this year! 

Tosses Difficulty (10 Points)

  • 0 Points – No skills performed
  • 1.0-6.0 Points – Tosses are thrown, but none are level appropriate
  • 6.0-9.0 Points – Less than a majority of the team perform a level-appropriate toss
  • 9.0-10.0 Points – A majority of the team perform a level-appropriate toss

Tosses Majority Definition

  • Based on 5-person stunt groups
  • The Majority is determined by dividing the total number of athletes by 5, then dividing by two, and then adding one group. (Total Athletes / 5) / 2 + 1 = Majority
  • Example: 38 athletes / 5 = 7.6 stunt groups divided by 2 equals 3.8 plus 1 equals 4.8, and then you round down to 4. 
  • Tosses are cumulative throughout the routine

Tosses Difficulty Scoring Considerations Once in Range

  • Skill degree of difficulty
  • Height
  • Percentage of team participation
  • Additional skills and skill combinations may increase your score within a range (includes non-level appropriate skills)

Tosses Technique (10 Points)

  • 0 Points – No skills performed
  • 1.0-5.0 Points – Skills performed with poor execution, flexibility, synchronization, and limited toss height
  • 5.0-8.0 Points – Skills performed with average execution, flexibility, synchronization, and average toss height
  • 8.0-10.0 Points – Skills performed with above-average execution, flexibility, synchronization, and above-average toss height

USASF Building Creativity (5 Points)

Building judges look at every single building skill from the start of the routine to the end. They’re looking for unique and interesting skill combinations. 

  • 0 Points – No skills performed
  • 1.0-2.0 Points – Below average innovative, visual, unique, and intricate ideas in level and non-level appropriate – considered for all stunts, pyramids, and tosses
  • 2.0-3.0 Points – Average innovative, visual, unique, and intricate ideas in level and non-level appropriate – considered for all stunts, pyramids, and tosses
  • 3.0-5.0 Points – Above average innovative, visual, unique, and intricate ideas in level and non-level appropriate – considered for all stunts, pyramids, and tosses

USASF Jumps (20 Points)

Jumps are not required to be connected, however connected jumps are a consideration in driving the difficulty score. 

Jumps Difficulty (10 Points)

  • 0 Points – No jumps were performed
  • 1.0-5.0 Points – Two or fewer jumps were performed
  • 5.0-9.0 Points – Less than a majority of the team performed three jumps
  • 9.0-10.0 Points – A majority of the team performs three advanced jumps

Jumps Majority Definition

  • Half of the total athletes plus one
  • 38 Athletes / 2 = 19 + 1 = 20
  • Jumps are cumulative throughout the routine

Advanced Jumps Include:

  • Herkie
  • Herdler
  • Toe Touch
  • Pike
  • Double Nine

Jumps Difficulty Scoring Considerations Once in Range

  • Percentage of team participation
  • Synchronization
  • Variety
  • Connected Jumps
  • Configuration (quantity, choreography, etc.)

Jumps Technique (10 Points)

  • 0 Points – No skills performed
  • 1.0-5.0 Points – Skills performed with poor execution, flexibility, and synchronization
  • 5.0-8.0 Points – Skills performed with average execution, flexibility, and synchronization
  • 8.0-10.0 Points – Skills performed with above-average execution, flexibility, and synchronization

USASF Standing Tumbling (20 Points)

Synchronized tumbling is not required to enter any range, but it is taken into consideration because it is considered more difficult and demonstrates that athletes are not being recycled. 
 

Standing Tumbling Difficulty (10 Points)

  • 0 Points – No skills performed
  • 1.0-6.0 Points – Less than a majority of athletes perform one level-appropriate standing tumbling pass
  • 6.0-10.0 Points – A majority of the athletes perform one level-appropriate standing tumbling pass

Standing Tumbling Majority Definition

  • Half of the total athletes plus one
  • Half of the total athletes plus one
  • 38 Athletes / 2 = 19 + 1 = 20 athletes
  • Standing Tumbling is cumulative throughout the routine

Standing Tumbling Difficulty Scoring Considerations Once in Range

  • Skill degree of difficulty
  • Percentage of team participation
  • Specialty combination/creativity, including jump/tumble combinations

Standing Tumbling Technique (10 Points)

  • 0 Points – No skills performed
  • 1.0-5.0 Points – Skills performed with poor execution, flexibility, and synchronization
  • 5.0-8.0 Points – Skills performed with average execution, flexibility, and synchronization
  • 8.0-10.0 Points – Skills performed with above-average execution, flexibility, and synchronization

USASF Running Tumbling (20 Points)

Like the Standing Tumbling section, Running Tumbling does not require synchronization to enter the high range. However, synchronization and other difficulty elements are taken into consideration to rank teams against their competition. 

Running Tumbling Difficulty (10 Points)

  • 0 Points – No skills performed
  • 1.0-6.0 Points – Less than a majority of the athletes perform one level-appropriate running tumbling pass
  • 6.0-10.0 Points – A majority of the athletes perform one level-appropriate running tumbling pass

Running Tumbling Majority Definition

  • Half of the total athletes plus one
  • 38 Athletes / 2 = 19 + 1 = 20 athletes
  • Running Tumbling is cumulative throughout the routine

Running Tumbling Difficulty Scoring Considerations Once in Range

  • Skill degree of difficulty
  • Percentage of team participation
  • Specialty combination and creativity
  • Synchronization
  • Variety
  • Additional skills and a combination of skills may increase your score within a range, including non-level appropriate skills.

Running Tumbling Technique (10 Points)

  • 0 Points – No skills performed
  • 1.0-5.0 Points – Skills performed with poor execution, flexibility, and synchronization
  • 5.0-8.0 Points – Skills performed with average execution, flexibility, and synchronization
  • 8.0-10.0 Points – Skills performed with above-average to perfect execution and synchronization

USASF Routine Composition (10 Points)

There are two overall judges, and their scores are averaged. This is a comparison to what other teams have performed and what they have scored. 

  • 1.0-5.0 Points – Below Average
  • 5.0-8.0 Points – Average
  • 8.0-10 Points – Above Average

Routine composition based on below-average, average, or above-average demonstration of:

  • Precision of spacing
  • Seamless patterns of movement
  • Innovative, visual, creative ideas
  • Additional skills used to enhance the overall appeal

USASF Dance (5 Points)

There are two overall judges, and their scores are averaged. This is a comparison to what other teams performed and what they scored.
 
  • 0 Points – No skills performed
  • 1.0-2.0 Points – Below average
  • 2.0-3.0 Points – Average
  • 3.0-5.0 Points – Above Average

The dance score is based on how well the following skills and elements are performed:

  • Entertainment value
  • Energy level
  • Visual elements
  • Variety of levels
  • Formation changes
  • Footwork and floor work
  • Partner work
  • Pace and intricacy
  • Technique
  • Perfection
  • Synchronization
  • Team participation

USASF Performance (10 Points)

There are two overall judges, and their scores are averaged. This is a comparison to what other teams have performed and what they have scored. 

  • 1.0-5.0 Points – Below Average
  • 5.0-8.0 Points – Average
  • 8.0-10.0 Points – Above Average

This is an overall score that takes into account the entire performance, including:

  • Energy levels, entertainment value, and excitement
  • Consistent uniformity, genuine enthusiasm, and showmanship
  • Includes appropriate athletic impression in conjunction with USASF’s Athletic Performance Standards throughout the routine

IASF – Level 5, 6 & 7 Tumbling Divisions

Total Points: 150

IASF Tumbling (15 Points)

In both standing and running tumbling, synchronized passes are rewarded. Specifically in running tumbling, teams who do not have synchronized passes could be capped at a 2.0. The running tumbling high range of 2.0-5.0 points requires passes with multiple athletes and multiple synchronized passes. Passes do not need to be the same to be synchronized and can mix skill levels. 

Standing Tumbling Difficulty (5 Points)

  • 0 Points – No skills performed
  • 0.1-2.0 Points – Less than a majority of the athletes perform one level-appropriate standing tumbling pass and/or the majority perform below level-appropriate passes.
  • 2.0-5.0 Points – A majority of the athletes perform one level-appropriate standing tumbling pass, including passes with multiple athletes and multiple synchronized passes.

Running Tumbling Difficulty (5 Points)

  • 0 Points – No skills performed
  • 0.1-2.0 Points – Less than a majority of athletes perform one level-appropriate running tumbling pass, and/or the majority perform below level-appropriate passes.
  • 1.0-2.0 Points – A majority of athletes perform one level-appropriate running tumbling pass, minimal synchronized passes.
  • 2.0-5.0 Points – A majority of the athletes perform one level-appropriate running tumbling pass, including passes with multiple athletes and multiple synchronized passes.

Tumbling Difficultly Scoring Considerations:

  • Degree of difficulty
  • Percentage of team participation
  • Variety
  • Synchronization
  • Jump/Tumbling combination (tumbling only)
  • Jump/tuck combination is considered level-appropriate in Standing Tumbling for Levels 5-7
  • In levels 1-4, individual tumbling passes (performed by a single person) will not be considered in the scoring process

How Tumbling Majority is Determined:

  • Half of the total athletes plus one
  • 38 Athletes / 2 = 19 + 1 = 20 athletes
  • Round down from the decimal if necessary
  • Running and Standing Tumbling is cumulative throughout the routine

Tumbling Execution/Technique (5 Points)

The tumbling execution score is combined for standing and running tumbling. 

  • 0 Points – No skills performed
  • 0.1-1.0 Points – Tumbling skills/pass(es) executed with below average technique and synchronization.
  • 1.0-2.0 Points – Tumbling skills/pass(es) executed with average technique and synchronization.
  • 2.0-5.0 Points – Tumbling skills/pass(es) executed with above average to excellent technique and synchronization. 

IASF Jumps (5 Points)

Jumps follow the same comparative scoring model as the other sections. Once a team performs three advanced jumps they can score from 3 to 5 points based on how difficult and technically perfect they were performed in comparison to their competitors on that day. 

Technique and Difficulty are combined into one score for Jumps.

  • 0 Points – No jump skills were performed
  • 1.0-2.0 Points – Less than a majority of the team performs 1-3 jumps. Jump skills executed with below-average to average technique, perfection, flexibility, and synchronization.
  • 2.0-3.0 Points – Less than a majority of the team performs 1-3 jumps. Jump skills executed with above-average to excellent technique, perfection, flexibility, and synchronization.
  • 3.0-4.0 Points – The majority of the team performs 3 advanced jumps. Jump skills with average to above-average technique, perfection, flexibility, and synchronization.
  • 4.0-5.0 Points – The majority of the team performs 3 advanced jumps. Jump skills with above-average to excellent technique, flexibility, and synchronization.

How Jumps Majority is Determined:

  • Half of the total athletes plus one
  • 38 Athletes / 2 = 19 + 1 = 20 athletes
  • Round down from the decimal if necessary
  • Jumps cumulative throughout the routine

Jump Difficulty Scoring Considerations:

  • Percentage of team participation
  • Synchronization
  • Height of jumps
  • Variety
  • Connected jumps

IASF Stunts (40 Points)

As is the case with USASF, this is a comparison score. After the majority of a team performs level-appropriate skills, the judges compare the technique and difficulty based on other teams in the same division on the same day. 

Stunts Difficulty – All Girl (20 Points)

  • 0 Points – No skills performed
  • 1.0-8.0 Points – Less than a majority of the athletes perform level-appropriate skills
  • 8.0-20.0 Points – A majority of the athletes perform level-appropriate skills

Stunts Difficulty – Coed (20 Points)

  • 0 Points – No skills performed
  • 1.0-8.0 Points – Less than a majority of the athletes perform level-appropriate skills. NO single base or assisted single-based skills were performed
  • 8.0-16.0 Points – A majority of the athletes perform level-appropriate skills. Less than a majority perform single-based or assisted single-based skills
  • 10.0-20.0 Points – A majority of the athletes perform level-appropriate skills, and a majority of the athletes perform single-based or assisted single-based skills

How Stunts and Pyramids Majority is Determined:

  • Based on 4-person stunt groups
  • The Majority is determined by dividing the total number of athletes by four, then dividing by two, and then adding one group. (Total Athletes / 4) / 2 + 1 = Majority
  • Example: 24 athletes / 4 = 6 stunt groups divided by 2 equals 3 plus 1 equals 4 groups, and then you round down if there is a decimal.
  • Stunts are cumulative throughout the routine
  • The majority for single-based/assisted skills for coed divisions will use the same majority calculation. 

Considerations for Stunts and Pyramid Difficulty

  • Minimal use of bases
  • Degree of difficulty
  • Percentage of team participation
  • Variety of load-ins, dismounts, and transitional elements
  • Additional skills and a combination of skills may increase your score, including non-level skills. 

Stunts Technique (20 Points) 

  • 0 Points – No skills performed
  • 1.0-8.0 Points – Stunt skills executed with below-average stability, flexibility, and synchronization.
  • 8.0-16.0 Points – Stunt skills executed with average technique, stability, flexibility, and synchronization.
  • 16.0-20.0 Points – Stunt skills executed with above-average technique, stability, flexibility, and synchronization.

IASF Pyramids (40 Points)

The same methodology for Stunts is applied to Pyramids. 

Pyramid Difficulty (20 Points)

  • 0 Points – No skills performed
  • 1.0-8.0 Points – No structures with transitional elements
  • 8.0-16.0 Points – Minimal level appropriate skills and/or less than two structures.
  • 10.0-20.0 Points – A majority of the athletes perform level-appropriate skills and at least two structures.

Majority definition and difficulty considerations are listed above in Stunts.

Pyramid Technique (20 Points) 

  • 1.0-8.0 Points – Pyramid skills executed with below-average technique, flexibility, and synchronization.
  • 8.0-16.0 Points – Pyramid skills executed with average technique, flexibility, and synchronization.
  • 16.0-20 Points – Pyramid skills executed with above-average to excellent technique, flexibility, and synchronization.

IASF Tosses (10 Points)

As is the case with USASF, after a majority of a team performs a level-appropriate toss, judges will compare teams across their division and day. There are several considerations for Tosses, including variety and a combination of skills that could increase your score. 

Tosses Difficulty (5 Points)

  • 0 Points – No tosses performed
  • 0.1-2.0 Points – Tosses are thrown, but none are level appropriate
  • 2.0-3.0 Points – Less than a majority of the team performs a level-appropriate toss
  • 3.0-5.0 Points – A majority of the team performs a level-appropriate toss

Tosses Majority Definition

  • Based on 5-person stunt groups
  • The Majority is determined by dividing the total number of athletes by 5, then dividing by two, and then adding one group. (Total Athletes / 5) / 2 + 1 = Majority
  • Example: 24 athletes / 5 = 4.8 stunt groups divided by 2 equals 2.4 plus 1 equals 3.4, and then you round down to 3.
  • Tosses are cumulative throughout the routine

Considerations for Tosses Difficulty

  • Degree of difficulty
  • Height of tosses
  • Additional skills, a variety of skills, and a combination of skills may increase your score, including non-level appropriate skills
  • Minimal use of bases does not apply in scoring tosses.

Tosses Technique (5 Points)

  • 0 Points – No tosses performed
  • 0.1-2.0 Points – Tosses executed with below-average technique, flexibility,
  • synchronization, and below-average height
  • 2.0-3.0 Points – Toss skills executed with average technique, flexibility, synchronization, and average height.
  • 3.0-5.0 Points – Toss skills executed with above-average to excellent technique, flexibility, synchronization, and above-average height.

IASF Building Creativity (10 Points)

Building creativity takes into account Stunts, Pyramids, and Tosses. Building judges look at every single building skill from the start of the routine to the end. They’re looking for unique and interesting skill combinations. 

  • 1.0-3.0 Points – Below average visual, unique, and intricate skills
  • 3.0-8.0 Points – Average visual, unique, and intricate skills
  • 8.0-10.0 Points – Above average visual, unique, and intricate skills

IASF Dance (5 Points)

There are two overall judges who give their own scores and feedback independently, and then it is averaged.

  • 0-1.0 Points – Dance has minimal incorporations of level changes and formation changes with dance skills that create minimal visual effects with seamless transitions, few footwork, partner work, and floorwork skills performed with low energy and entertainment value. Unsynchronized and slow pace.
  • 1.0-2.0 Points – Dance has incorporations of level changes and formation changes with dance skills that create some visual effects with seamless transitions, footwork, partner work, and floor work skills performed with good energy and entertainment value. Synchronization of elements mostly together with average pace.
  • 2.0-5.0 Points – Dance has multiple incorporations of level changes and formation changes with dance skills that create many visual effects with seamless transitions, a variety of footwork, partner work, and floor work skills performed with high energy and entertainment value. Great synchronization with a strong pace.

IASF Routine Creativity (5 Points)

There are two overall judges who give their own scores and feedback independently, and then it is averaged.

  • 1.0-2.0 Points – Minimal innovative, visual, unique, and intricate ideas and incorporations
  • 2.0-4.0 Points – Average innovative, visual, unique, and intricate ideas and incorporations
  • 4.0-5.0 Points – Above average to excellent innovative, visual, unique, and intricate ideas and incorporations

IASF Formations and Transitions (10 Points)

There are two overall judges who give their own scores and feedback independently, and then it is averaged.

  • 1.0-3.0 Points – Below average in spacing, seamless pattern of movement, degree of difficulty with timing problems throughout the routine, along with poor use of floor with minimal visual elements.
  • 3.0-8.0 Points – Average spacing and seamless patterns of movement. Average degree of difficulty, few timing problems with average use of floor and visual elements.
  • 8.0-10 Points – Above average to excellent in spacing, seamless patterns of movement, and degree of difficulty. Formation changes are cleanly executed with little to no timing problems. Formation changes throughout the routine that add to the visual impact and excitement of the routine. Great use of the total floor.

IASF Overall Routine Impression and Showmanship (10 Points)

There are two overall judges who give their own scores and feedback independently, and then it is averaged.

  • 1.0-3.0 Points – Below average effectiveness in performing a comprehensive and positive memorable experience.
  • 3.0-8.0 Points – Average effectiveness in performing a comprehensive and positive memorable experience
  • 8.0-10.0 Points – Above average to excellent effectiveness in performing a comprehensive and positive memorable experience.

IASF – Global Level 6

Total Points: 160

Global Level 6 (All-Girl and Coed) use the same scoresheet as the IASF tumbling division outlined above. In addition, Global Teams have an additional 10-point section for the cheer.

Cheer Criteria (10 Points)

The Cheer section is judged by single person who only scores the cheer. This individual will not score the music portion of the routine. 

  • 0 Points – No cheer performed
  • 1.0-10.0 Points – Native Language Encouraged Crowd Effectiveness- Voice, Pace & Flow. Ability to lead the crowd for the team’s nation, team/program, delegation, and all spectators. Proper use of signs, poms, megaphones, flags, and motion technique. Practical use of Stunts/pyramids to lead the crowd. Execution.

IASF – Non-Tumbling Levels 6 & 7

Total Points: 135

IASF Non-Tumbling divisions use the same scoring structure as IASF tumbling divisions for these sections:

  • Stunts
  • Pyramid
  • Tosses
  • Building Creativity
  • Jumps
  • Dance
  • Overall Routine Creativity
  • Overall Routine Formations/Transitions
  • Overall/Showmanship

Non-Tumbling Does Not Include The Following Sections:

  • Standing Tumbling (5 points)
  • Running Tumbling (5 points)
  • Tumbling Execution & Technique (5 Points)

Deductions (All Divisions)

USASF and IASF use the same guidelines for deductions.

  • Athlete Bobbles (-1 per occurrence)
    • Hands down in tumbling
    • Knees down in tumbling or jumps
    • Incomplete tumbling twist(s) (the landing position of the athlete’s feet will be used to determine completion)
  • Athlete Fall (-2 per occurrence)
    • Multiple body parts down in tumbling or jumps
    • Drops to the floor during individual skills (tumbling, jumps, etc.)
  • Building Bobbles (-2 per occurrence)
    • Stunts, tosses and pyramids that almost drop/fall from the intended position (determined or measured by the other stunts being performed simultaneously if applicable), but are saved (includes excessive movement of bases).
    • Blatant incomplete twisting cradles (landing on the stomach, etc.)
    • Knee or hand touching the ground during cradle or dismount
    • Controlled cradling, dismounting, or bringing down a stunt or pyramid early (not timing issues)
  • Building Falls (-3 per occurrence)
    • Uncontrolled cradling, dismounting, or bringing down a stunt or pyramid early (not timing issues). from the intended position (determined or measured by the other stunts being performed simultaneously if applicable).
    • Base falling to the floor during a cradle or dismount
  • Major Building Falls (-4 per occurrence)
    • Falls from individual stunt, pyramid or tosses to the ground (top person lands on ground).
  • Maximum Building Falls (-5 per occurrence)
    • When multiple deductions should be assessed during an individual stunt or toss (by a single group), then the sum of those deductions will not be greater than 5.
  • Pyramid Collapse (-6)
    • When multiple deductions should be assessed within the same pyramid structure/transition (by 2 or more groups), then the sum of those deductions will not be greater than 6.
  • Safety Violations/Skill Performed Out of Level (-4 per occurrence)
  • Time Limit Violations (-1 per second over time)
  • Boundary Violations (-1 per occurrence)
    • An occurrence is defined as BOTH feet off the 42’ by 54’ performance surface AND any immediate adjacent safety border.
    • An athlete must have at least one foot touching the performing surface and/or adjacent safety border to be considered inbounds.

Getting the Final Score

At Worlds, the final score is determined by adding up all of the sections and deducting the mistakes. They do not utilize the percentage of perfection we are used to seeing during the regular season. 

If You Enjoyed This Guide, Please Share It!

Facebook
Twitter

Follow CheerTheory Everywhere Online